Goals and habits

Willpower versus Healthy Habits

This month saw the passing of psychologist Walter Mischel, best known for his famed “marshmallow experiment” on delayed gratification. The marshmallow experiment became a symbol of the power of delayed gratification for life success. What does this mean for your finances?  For starters, don’t rely on willpower for achieving your money goals. Instead spend that energy reshaping a single healthier habit next month.  

Learning to be gritty

April is National Financial Literacy Month, so I’ve been reading stories of everyday people working through money struggles. My favorite read this month has been Make Your Kid A Money Genius (Even If You’re Not) by Beth Kobliner. The ability to stick with it and persevere matters more than your IQ and educational background. Studies show that grit leads to a more satisfied life, as well as higher income and net worth. And here’s the best part: grit can be learned, both by kids and adults.

Goals + Habits = Progress

Fall provides an opportunity to refocus your goals and reset your habits. Money touches most of our life goals, even goals that aren’t explicitly financial (such as spending more time with your significant other, which may require money for dates or vacation). Healthy money habits can facilitate these goals as well as help you progress toward financial freedom.